Detailed guide: Tell HMRC about a Student Loan in your tax return

Updated: This guidance has been updated with information on how to give details of your Student Loan on an online tax return.

You’ll need to complete the Student Loan repayment section of your Self Assessment tax return if the Student Loans Company (SLC) has said your repayments were due to start on or before 6 April of the year you’re completing your return for.

You must include information on your Student Loan repayments in your Self Assessment tax return. If you don’t give the correct information you may have to pay penalties.

Your Student Loan deduction will be calculated based on 9% of your total income above the threshold of your plan type. Information on your plan type is supplied to HMRC by the SLC.

Give the information on a paper or online tax return.

Information you’ll need

You’ll need to say if you think your Student Loan might be fully repaid within the next 2 years.

You’ll also need details of any amounts already deducted through your employment.

If you’ve had more than one job in the year, you’ll need to add up the repayments shown on all of your payslips, rather than just those of the most recent job. Your P60 won’t show the amounts deducted by a previous employer.

If you don’t have access to some or all of your payslips or P45s, you can contact your:

  • previous employer, if you’ve changed jobs and don’t have your P45
  • current employer, if you’re missing a payslip or P60

If you’ve had more than one source of income in the year, you might have to pay more than just your Pay As You Earn (PAYE) deductions.

Paper tax return

Box 1

Put an ‘X’ in box 1 if the SLC have told you that your repayments started on or before 6 April of the year you’re completing your return for.

This is the only question you have to answer if you’re repaying your Student Loan and don’t have any PAYE income.

Box 2

Put the total of the amounts already deducted through your employment for the tax year you’re completing your return for. You can work this out by adding up all the Student Loan deductions on your payslips for that year.

Box 3

Put an ‘X’ in box 3 if you believe you’ll completely repay your Student Loan within 2 years.

Completing this box won’t defer any payments or stop late payment interest and penalties but can help stop you overpaying.

Online tax return

Section 2 – ‘Tell us about you’

Select ‘Yes’ then choose the type of plan that you’re repaying if the SLC have told you that your repayments started on or before 6 April of the year you’re completing your return for.

This is the only question you have to answer if you’re repaying your Student Loan and don’t have any PAYE income.

Section 4 – ‘Fill in your return’

Put the total of the amounts already deducted through your employment for the tax year you’re completing your return for. You can work this out by adding up all the Student Loan deductions on your payslips for that year.

Select ‘Yes’ if you think you’ll completely repay your Student Loan within 2 years. This won’t defer any payments or stop late payment interest and penalties but can help stop you overpaying.

Voluntary payments

If you want to, you can make additional payments to SLC. These voluntary payments are separate to amounts collected by your employer or through your tax return and won’t change them.

You can’t choose to make these additional payments instead of your normal payments and voluntary payments can’t be refunded.

Voluntary payments will reduce the overall length of your loan and the interest charged on it.

Source: HMRC

Guidance: HMRC exchange rates for 2017: monthly

Updated: The April 2017 monthly exchange rates have been added to the page.

You should use these exchanges rates if you have to convert any foreign currency to sterling for customs and VAT purposes.

Please note that the European Community rate includes the following countries: Austria, Belgium, Cyprus, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia and Spain.

You should only use the European Community rate for conversion of invoices drawn in the euro. It shouldn’t be confused with the euro rate published for agricultural levy purposes or the bit error rate (BER) daily rate set to facilitate payment of taxes in the euro.

Find exchange rates in XML format for software developers.

Source: HMRC

Detailed guide: Widening Access Training scheme: refunds for NHS Trust workers

Updated: Contact details under what to do if the relevant NHS Trust no longer exists have been amended.

Find out if you’re eligible for a refund

If you’ve received payments from your NHS employer whilst attending a Widening Access Training (WAT) course, you might be entitled to a refund of the Income Tax and National Insurance contributions you paid.

Payments made by employers to workers getting full-time instruction can be exempted from Income Tax and National Insurance contributions if certain conditions are met.

Conditions

You may be eligible for a refund if you attended a qualifying WAT course and your employer deducted Income Tax and National Insurance contributions from your pay during that period.

If you did a combination of paid work for an NHS Trust and attended a qualifying WAT course, you may also be eligible for a refund if your employer deducted Income Tax and National Insurance contributions from all of your pay.

Getting a refund

Courses attended before 6 April 2013

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) will deal with your refund application if your employer deducted Income Tax and National Insurance contributions while you attended a qualifying WAT course before 6 April 2013.

Your NHS Trust will submit a claim to HMRC on your behalf. HMRC has asked trusts to provide full details of eligible workers, and will process claims when they’re received. You should contact your Trust and ask if they’ve already sent a claim to HMRC on your behalf.

You don’t need to do anything more if the Trust confirms they’ve already submitted your claim.
If your NHS Trust hasn’t already sent a claim to HMRC, request they submit a claim on your behalf for courses starting on or before 5 April 2013.

Your NHS Trust may ask you for further information or evidence to support your application for refund.

Courses attended from 6 April 2013

If you attended a qualifying WAT course on or after the 6 April 2013 your refund claim will be dealt with by your NHS Trust.

If Income Tax and National Insurance contributions were deducted incorrectly from your pay while you attended a qualifying WAT course, your NHS Trust will deal with your claim through their payroll system.

The NHS Trust no longer exists

If the NHS Trust that employed you no longer exists, you’ll need to write to HMRC to review your refund application. You don’t need to include a street name, city name or PO box when writing to this address.

Widening Access National Insurance Contributions and Employer Office

HM Revenue and Customs

BX9 1BX

United Kingdom

To assist HMRC with your claim, please send the following information:

  • the name of the NHS Trust or NHS Board that employed you
  • confirmation that the NHS Trust no longer exists
  • the reason you believe are eligible for a refund
  • the date the WAT course started and the date when it ended
  • evidence of the amount you were paid by NHS Trust while you attended the WAT course
  • evidence that you completed the training course
  • your National Insurance number

Possible effect on your benefits and state pension

If you get a refund of National Insurance contributions you might find that your National Insurance record is deficient. This could affect your entitlement to state pension and benefits.

You can pay voluntary contributions to make up any shortfall.

Any changes to your income can also affect your entitlement to Tax Credits.

Source: HMRC

Promotional material: Your personal tax account

Updated: Updated to reflect services currently available via the personal tax account.

Your personal tax account allows you to manage your tax affairs online, quickly and simply, whenever you want.

This page describes:

  • what the personal tax account does
  • who it’s for
  • how you can access yours

Source: HMRC

Consultation outcome: Hybrid and other mismatches – draft guidance

Updated: Summary of responses, and updated draft guidance published

This draft guidance is provided to assist understanding of the application of the hybrids mismatch legislation, which take effect from 1 January 2017.

The examples contained are based upon a selection of those contained within the OECD ‘Final Report on Neutralising the Effects of Hybrid Mismatch Arrangements’, with additional draft examples dealing with hybrid transfers and permanent establishments.

Source: HMRC

Form: Application for Transfer of Residence relief (ToR1)

Updated: Form updated as the conditions for applying for a Transfer of Residence have changed.

Apply for Transfer of Residence relief if you want to transfer your normal place of residence from outside the EU to the UK.

You should also use the form to declare if you want to:

  • import any vehicles to the UK for you or your family to use
  • bring any pets to the UK

The ToR1 has replaced the following forms:

  • Import and export: bringing personal belongings to UK from outside the European Community (C3)
  • Import and export: bringing your pet to the UK from outside the European Community (C5)
  • Import and export: import of private motor vehicle from outside the European Community (C104A)
  • Import and export: import of private vessel from outside the European Community (C104A Vessels)

Give as much information as you can in your application.

Fill in the form on-screen, print if off and post it to HM Revenue and Customs before you start to move any personal property to the UK.

You’ll need to fill in the form fully before you can print it. You can’t save a partly completed form.

Before you start using the form

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Moving your belongings to the UK
This guidance gives details of your tax and customs responsibilities when you move your personal belongings to the UK from abroad.

Customs clearance for transfers of residence to the UK and EU
This guidance gives details on entitlement to Transfer of Residence relief, and the procedures to follow for shipments to the UK, or for onward delivery to EU.

Notice 3: bringing your belongings, pets and private motor vehicles to UK from outside the EU
This notice explains how to import your personal belongings, pets and private motor vehicles into the UK from outside the EU.

Source: HMRC