Guidance: Advisory Fuel Rates

Updated: Small text amendment to part 2 of ‘When you can use the mileage rates’. Dispensation to cover the payments no longer exist.

These rates only apply to employees using a company car.

HM Revenue and Customs review rates quarterly on 1 March, 1 June, 1 September and 1 December.

You should check to make sure you understand when you can use the rates.

Source: HMRC

Detailed guide: Admitting tax fraud: the Contractual Disclosure Facility

Updated: The contact details for the Contractual Disclosure Facility have been updated.

Report fraud

If you want to report someone else for fraud you can tell HMRC – your information will be handled securely and safely – and you don’t have to give your name.

Owning up to fraud

This guide explains what happens and what to do if you get a letter and a Code of Practice 9 (COP9) from HMRC. It will explain that HMRC suspect you of committing tax fraud, and will offer you a contract though the Contractual Disclosure Facility (CDF). It also explains what to do if you want to own up voluntarily to committing fraud.

CDF is only suitable for people who want to admit to tax fraud. It’s not for people who want to tell HMRC about errors, mistakes or avoidance schemes where there isn’t fraud. The CDF is for individuals only, this disclosure facility is not suitable for companies.

About the CDF

The CDF is the opportunity for you to tell HMRC about any tax fraud you’ve been involved in.

If HMRC write to you because you’re suspected of committing a tax fraud, the letter will offer you a CDF contract and will include:

  • an acceptance letter
  • a rejection letter
  • a disclosure form
  • a copy of COP9

Under CDF, you’ve 2 options:

  • own up to bringing about a loss of tax through your deliberate conduct – you do this by accepting the offer of CDF
  • reject the offer of CDF

What happens if you own up to committing fraud

If your deliberate conduct has brought about a loss of tax, you must think about whether using CDF is right for you.

If you decide it’s right, sign up to the CDF contract with HMRC. This means that both you and HMRC agree to stick to the terms and conditions of the contract.

HMRC will agree not to criminally investigate with a view to prosecuting you for the deliberate conduct you tell them about in the CDF contract.

You will:

  • admit that your deliberate conduct has brought about a loss of tax
  • tell HMRC about all the tax losses brought about by your deliberate conduct
  • give as much detail as you can within 60 days of being offered the contract
  • give additional details, in the form of a report, following the 60 day period – include a statement that you’ve given HMRC complete and accurate details of your deliberate conduct

Accepting HMRC’s offer of CDF is the only way to guarantee that HMRC won’t criminally investigate with a view to prosecuting you for the tax losses your deliberate conduct brought about.

If you meet your side of the contract, you’ll make sure that any penalties are closer to the lower penalty levels.

Timescales

You’ve 60 days to decide whether you want to accept HMRC’s offer of CDF. The 60 day period will run for 60 calendar days after you get the CDF letter from HMRC.

This deadline can only be extended in exceptional circumstances. If you think this applies to you, contact HMRC by email at centre.cop9@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk with your circumstances and you’ll get a response within 7 days.

During the 60 day period, HMRC won’t contact you unless you’ve told them that you either do or don’t want to provide details of tax fraud.

HMRC can still:

  • take action against goods you own or possess
  • start or continue debt collection
  • continue any other action that’s needed as part of HMRC’s legal obligations

What happens if you reject the offer of CDF

If you reject the offer of CDF, HMRC may begin a criminal investigation into your tax affairs at any time. The letter you’ve signed can be used in court as evidence to show that you intended to deliberately mislead HMRC.

Following your rejection, someone in HMRC will contact you to explain what will happen next and what you need to do.

What happens if you don’t reply to HMRC’s letter

If HMRC don’t hear from you within the 60 days, either to accept or reject the offer of CDF, they’ll assume you’ve chosen not to co-operate. HMRC will begin either a civil or a criminal investigation into the suspected tax fraud.

Owning up to tax fraud voluntarily

If you’ve committed tax fraud and you want to own up to this, let HMRC know.

By filling in the contractual disclosure form CDF 1 you can ask HMRC to consider you for a CDF contract. You don’t have to wait for HMRC to contact you.

HMRC don’t have to offer you a contract, and won’t be able to if you’re already involved in a criminal investigation by HMRC or another law enforcement agency (such as the police).

If you’re already dealing with HMRC on other tax issues but want to be considered for CDF, discuss this with the HMRC officer dealing with your case.

The CDF offer and how it works

The Code of Practice 9 (COP9) explains how the CDF works. If this doesn’t answer your question, you can contact HMRC by email at centre.cop9@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk and you’ll get a response within 7 days.

HMRC strongly advise that you get independent advice before you complete any CDF letter or form, or ask if you can enter into a contract with them.

The helpdesk will:

  • answer technical questions about CDF
  • explain what specific things mean, for example, if you don’t understand part of one of the letters HMRC has sent you

The helpdesk can’t:

  • answer questions about your own case, or anyone else’s
  • give advice about examples or pretend situations (hypothetical questions)
  • answer questions about any other area of tax or benefit that is administered by HMRC

Look for more detailed guidance in the Fraud civil investigation manual. It may provide the information you need, but if not you can contact HMRC by email at centre.cop9@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk.

Code of Practice 9 investigations where HMRC suspect tax fraud tells you in detail what HMRC does when it suspects someone of committing tax fraud. It explains what it means for you and what your rights are.

Completing the outline disclosure form

If the completion instructions in part 4 and 4a of the outline disclosure don’t answer your question, you can contact HMRC by email at centre.cop9@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk. You’ll get a response within 7 days.

Where to send the outline disclosure and acceptance letter

Send your completed outline disclosure and acceptance letter to the address shown on our original letter to you.

If you can’t find this letter then send them to the following address:

HM Revenue and Customs

Fraud Investigation Service

COP9 Centre

S0828

Newcastle

NE98 1ZZ

Making a payment on account

We charge interest on tax and duty that is paid late. We charge it from the date the tax or duty should have been paid to the date that it is paid. To save you paying more interest than necessary, we recommend you pay any amount you think you may owe from the details you include in your outline disclosure.

We call such payments ‘payments on account’. Making a payment on account will stop the interest increasing on the amount of tax and duty you owe.

If payment information and the reference number isn’t shown in our letter, you can contact HMRC by email at centre.cop9@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk for this information. You’ll get a response within 7 days.

HMRC response to your outline disclosure and CDF acceptance letter

HMRC will acknowledge receipt of your outline disclosure and then review the content, which can take some time. We will contact you once the review is complete to let you know whether or not your outline disclosure is accepted.

If you’re concerned about the length of time it is taking to respond, you can contact HMRC by email at centre.cop9@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk with your concerns and you’ll get a response within 7 days.

Appointing an adviser or agent

HMRC strongly advise that you get independent advice before you complete any CDF letter or form, or ask if you can enter into a contract with them.

If you’ve previously given us a form 64-8 ‘Authorising your agent’, we’ll deal directly with the agent named on that form unless you tell us not to.

If you would like to appoint a new adviser, please complete form Comp1, ‘Compliance checks: temporary authorisation to allow HMRC to deal with your tax adviser’ and send it to HMRC with your completed Outline Disclosure.

Source: HMRC

Detailed guide: Claiming a top-up payment on small charitable donations

Updated: This guidance has been updated to reflect the rule changes for the Gift Aid Small Donations Scheme from 6 April 2017.

Overview

The Gift Aid Small Donations Scheme (GASDS) allows eligible charities and community amateur sports clubs (CASCs) to claim top-up payments on small donations of £20 or less.

Before 6 April 2017, you could only claim on small cash donations. Cash donations can be in coins or notes of any currency that have been collected and banked in the UK.

From 6 April 2017, you can also claim on donations made using ‘contactless’ technology, such as a contactless credit or debit card.

You don’t need to know the identity of the donors or collect Gift Aid declarations, which makes it easier to claim on donations like street collections.

Work out if your charity or CASC is eligible

The eligibility rules for charities and CASCs have been simplified.

To claim under GASDS before 6 April 2017 you must:

  • have claimed Gift Aid in the same tax year as you want to claim a GASDS top-up payment (you can now claim tax on Gift Aid donations and a GASDS top-up payment on small donations at the same time)
  • have not incurred a penalty on a Gift Aid or GASDS claim in this or the last tax year
  • have existed for at least 2 complete tax years, unless your charity or CASC has recently merged with another
  • have claimed Gift Aid in the same tax year as you want to claim a top-up payment (you can claim tax on Gift Aid donations and a top-up payment on small donations at the same time)

For small donations collected on or after 6 April 2017 the rules were simplified and to be eligible to claim under GASDS, your charity or CASC must:

  • have claimed Gift Aid in the same tax year as you want to claim a top-up payment (you can claim tax on Gift Aid donations and a top-up payment on small donations at the same time)
  • not have incurred a penalty on a Gift Aid or GASDS claim in this or the last tax year

You can’t claim on:

  • donations that come with a valid Gift Aid declaration
  • membership fees
  • a £20 portion of a larger gift

There are other rules that affect the amount you can claim on, which are explained on this page.

How GASDS claims are worked out

GASDS claims are calculated in the same way as Gift Aid.

Where the basic rate of income tax is 25%, a small donation income of £8,000 will entitle you to a GASDS top-up payment of £1,600.

Between 6 April 2013 and 5 April 2016, the maximum amount of small donations top-up payments was £5,000 per tax year.

From 6 April 2017, the maximum amount of small donations top-up payments is the lower of:
* £8,000
* 10 times the amount of donations you’ve claimed Gift Aid on

This is known as the ‘matching rule’.

To satisfy the matching rule, you must make claims on Gift Aid and small donations in the same tax year that you received them. The tax year is 6 April to 5 April, even if your own accounting year is different.

Example:

If you received £100 in Gift Aid donations, you could claim a top-up payment on £1,000 worth of small donations.
If a charity has a community building they may be able to claim on more donations than the £8,000 limit.

Community buildings

A community building is a building that the public (or a section of the public) have access to at some or all times. This could be a village hall, town hall or a place of worship.

Any part of a building that is used mainly for the sale of goods or for living in is not a community building.

However, if you have exclusive use of part of a building to carry out your charitable activity, such as a meeting room in a hotel, then the meeting room can be treated as a community building.

Charitable activities for at least 10 members of the public must be held in community buildings at least 6 times in a tax year (6 April to 5 April) for a building to qualify as a community building.

The community building rules do not apply to CASCs.

Collections in community buildings from 6 April 2017

From 6 April 2017, charities with more than 1 community building can only claim either:

  • a maximum of £8,000 on donations collected anywhere in the UK
  • a maximum of £8,000 for each community building on donations collected in the same Local Authority area as that building

Charities with fewer than 2 community buildings should claim on small donations collected anywhere in the UK.

Charities with 2 or more community buildings can choose the option that benefits them the most.

Charities that choose to claim a GASDS top-up payment under the community building rules can now claim on donations collected at any time (not just during a charitable activity) as long as they were collected in the same Local Authority area as the building that they are claiming for.

Collections in community buildings before 6 April 2017:

You can claim a top-up payment on small donations collected during charitable activities held in a community building, for example a church, a cathedral, a town hall, a mosque, a synagogue or a village hall.

You can continue to claim top-up payments on donations collected before 6 April 2017 until the end of the second tax year after the donation was collected.

For example, you can claim top-up payments on donations collected at any time during tax year 2015 to 2016 until 5 April 2018.

Charitable activities must be held in community buildings at least 6 times in a single tax year (6 April to 5 April) to qualify.

Charitable activity held in a community building must:

  • include at least 10 people who’ll benefit from the charitable activity
  • be open to members of the public

You can’t charge a fee to enter the building, or the part of the building, in which the activity takes place.

Activities carried out primarily for the purposes of fundraising, such as jumble sales, concerts and dinners, don’t count as charitable activities and aren’t eligible.

There’s no limit on the number of eligible community buildings that a charity can have.

Your charity could claim on up to £24,000 in one tax year if your charity 2 community buildings, made up of:

  • a maximum of £8,000 of small cash donations collected in each community building
  • a maximum of £8,000 of small cash donations collected elsewhere, such as a street collection

Example:

In one tax year, an animal welfare charity collected:

  • £4,000 in collection boxes around the town
  • £2,500 of small donations during its monthly charitable activities held in a village hall
  • £1,200 of small donations collected during charitable activities held every other month in a local church hall

The charity could claim top-up payments on all three collections.

The limit on small donations income was £5,000 on cash donations collected in each community building and £5,000 collected elsewhere per tax year between 6 April 2013 and 5 April 2016.

If your organisation is connected to another charity or CASC, other rules apply.

Connected charities and CASCs

If your charity or CASC is connected to another charity or CASC, you can pool small cash donations. The small donations amount that connected charities can share is:

  • £5,000 before 6 April 2016
  • £8,000 from 6 April 2016

On donations collected after 6 April 2017, connected charities can only claim on small donations collected in the same Local Authority area as their community buildings.

However, if the group of connected charities would be better off sharing a single £8,000 allowance for donations collected anywhere in the UK they can choose to do so by making an election to HMRC.

You’re connected if you:

• have the same or largely the same purposes and activities
• are controlled by the same or connected people

If one of your trustees is also a trustee for another charity or CASC, but the aims and activities of each organisation are largely different, then the 2 organisations are not considered connected.

Claiming GASDS if you’ve merged with another charity or CASC

From 6 April 2017, the rules about merging were simplified. If your merger began before 6 April 2017, you still need to follow the merging process.

Mergers from 6 April 2017

For claims relating to donations collected after 6 April 2017 you don’t need to follow the merger process because you no longer need to have a Gift Aid history.

You can start claiming GASDS straight away as long as you are also claiming Gift Aid in that tax year.

Mergers before 6 April 2017

If you merged with another organisation to continue the activities of the previous charity or CASC before 6 April 2017, you must apply to HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) to benefit from the Gift Aid compliance history of the other organisation by telling HMRC:

  • no later than 90 days from the date you formed the new organisation
  • 60 days before the new charity or CASC can make its first Gift Aid claim – HMRC will issue a certificate to show that your charity has taken over the activities of an old charity or CASC and the tax year that you will be eligible to make a claim for.

If you wish to take on the Gift Aid compliance history of another organisation, you must tell HMRC in writing.

The address is:

Charities, Savings and International 2

HM Revenue and Customs

BX9 1BU

United Kingdom

You can start claiming GASDS straight away as long as you are also claiming Gift Aid in that tax year.

Keeping records

You must keep records of small donations as evidence of your claim. Two people should ideally check and count the cash collected. You need to record:

  • how much money was collected, including each denomination of coins and notes
  • the date the money was collected
  • that no individual donation was greater than £20

From 6 April 2017 if you have collected contactless donations you will need to keep records produced by the contactless terminal to show:

  • how much money was collected
  • the date the money was collected
  • that no individual donation was greater than £20

You should keep records of any small donations you’ve collected for 6 years from the end of the tax year to which they relate.

Keeping records for community buildings

Some of the rules on keeping records of small donations collected during charitable events in community buildings were changed from 6 April 2017.

You can now choose to claim top-up payments on donations collected in the same Local Area authority as a community building – these can be collected at any time, not just during charitable activities.

This change affects how you should keep records from 6 April 2017.

Keeping records on donations from 6 April 2017

From 6 April 2017 if you choose to claim on amounts collected in the same Local Authority area as your Community Building you will need to keep a record of:

  • the address and postcode of the community building
  • the address (or addresses) where the donations were collected and the date of each collection
  • how and when that building met the charitable activity requirements

Keeping records on donations before 6 April 2017

Before 6 April 2017, if you collected small donations in a community building during a charitable activity, you must record:

  • the address and postcode of the community building
  • the type of charitable activity
  • an estimated number of beneficiaries who attended each charitable activity

How to make a GASDS claim

You must claim on small cash donations within 2 years from the end of the tax year that you collected them.

To claim online, you’ll need to register for Charities Online.

Use the Charities Online form to make a GASDS claim. You must give the total amount of the small donations you’re claiming on.

You may need:

To apply by post, you’ll need to contact HMRC on Telephone: 0300 123 1073 and request form ChR1.

If you receive an overpayment, include the incorrect amount that you received on your next claim. This amount will then be deducted from your next repayment.

If you haven’t been repaid the right amount or you submitted an incorrect claim, contact HMRC on Telephone: 0300 123 1073.

Source: HMRC

Detailed guide: Construction Industry Scheme: businesses based outside UK

Updated: Section added to clarify that overseas businesses and individuals dealing or developing UK land involving CIS activities, need to register for Corporation Tax or Income Tax, even if not based in the UK.

Construction Industry Scheme (CIS) covers construction work done in the UK and applies whether you’re based in the UK or abroad. There are different registration processes for sole traders, partnerships and companies.

How to register

Sole traders and partnerships

For sole traders and partnerships you’ll need to follow the same CIS rules as UK-based contractors and subcontractors.

Business that are limited companies

For businesses that are limited companies you must register before you start work by contacting HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) non-resident specialist CIS team. The registration process may take up to 6 weeks.

To register you’ll need:

  • to complete the form CIS305 (subcontractor application form) if you’re a subcontractor
  • copy of accounts (subcontractor gross application only)
  • original tax clearance certificate from the tax authorities of the company’s home country
  • a completed form 64-8 if you have an agent working for you

Send all the information to:

CIS Registrations, Charities Savings and International 1

HM Revenue and Customs

BX9 1AU

Telephone: 03000 516644

Outside UK: + 44 3000 516644

Trade in dealing or developing UK land

If your business is dealing or developing land in the UK, the profits are taxed in the UK. You’ll need to tell HMRC and register to pay tax as a company or an individual.

Companies

To register for Corporation Tax you must write to HMRC and provide:

  • the address of your company’s registered office
  • the date your annual accounts are made up to
  • the date that you started a business of dealing in or developing UK land (your company’s first accounting period will start from this date)
  • your company’s country of tax residence
  • your country of incorporation and date of incorporation

Send all the information to:

Corporation Tax Services

HM Revenue and Customs

BX9 1AX

United Kingdom

You don’t need to register with Companies House to register for Corporation Tax.

Individuals, sole traders and partnerships

You’ll need to register for Self Assessment if you’re not a company and you’re dealing or developing land in the UK.

Corporation Tax enquiries

You can contact HMRC for help with general Corporation Tax enquiries by phone, fax or post.

Double taxation agreements

This is when income gets taxed in 2 countries – the one where your business is resident and the one where you earn the income. It’s an agreement between 2 countries to reduce the amount of tax that’s actually paid.

The aim is to make sure you only pay the same, or close to the same, amount of tax as you would have paid if you’d earned the income at home.

You might be able to claim back some of the CIS deductions that contractors have made from your payments if you’re a non-resident subcontractor and your country has a double taxation agreement with the UK.

You won’t be exempt from UK tax if there’s no double taxation agreement, but CIS deductions contractors make from your payments count towards your tax bill.

Your tax bill for the year will be reduced by HMRC by the amount that’s already been paid in deductions.

Find out what countries have Double Taxation Treaties with the UK.

Source: HMRC

Detailed guide: How HMRC works with large businesses

Updated: Updated with the latest information on the role of HMRC Large Business, and how to contact them.

Large Business works with around 2,000 of the UK’s largest and most complex businesses to make sure they pay the correct amount of tax at the right time. We are actively investigating the tax affairs of around half of the UK’s largest businesses at any one time.

We also work with the rest of HMRC to tackle tax risk and deal with customers’ tax affairs.

HMRC’s approach to large business tax compliance

We direct our efforts where we think there’s the greatest risk of tax being unpaid. With large businesses, the money involved and the complexity of the tax affairs means we take a very pro-active approach.

We assign a senior tax expert called a Customer Compliance Manager (CCM) to each of the UK’s largest companies. Their primary role is to make sure the business pays everything they owe. This involves building in-depth knowledge of the business and the sectors they operate in.

Our CCMs are experts in their field and they’re supported by other tax specialists, including:

  • risk analysts
  • forensic and advisory accountants
  • solicitors
  • audit specialists
  • trade sector experts

How to contact Large Business

Contact your CCM if you’re a large business with a technical question.

If you have a general, non-technical query you can email your Large Business region.

You’ll need your 3 digit tax office code number that will be shown on all correspondence your Corporation Tax office has sent you:

Tax office code number Email address
005 contactus.largebusinessnorthwest@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk
054 contactus.largebusinesswestmidlands@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk
163 contactus.largebusinesslondon@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk
268 contactus.largebusinesslondon@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk
294 contactus.largebusinessnortheast@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk
349 contactus.largebusinessscotlandandni@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk
572 contactus.largebusinesseastmidlands@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk
660 contactus.largebusinesssouthandwales@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk
834 contactus.largebusinessscotlandandni@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk
854 contactus.largebusinessscotlandandni@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk

Source: HMRC

Guidance: Statutory market values for oil

Updated: The daily values for all Category 1 crude oils for February 2017 and March 2017 have been added.

If you’re a participator in a UK oil field, you must use these defined market value rates if you dispose of:

  • crude oil
  • liquefied petroleum gases (LPGs)
  • condensate

Each taxable crude blend has a separate market value. There’s 2 types of crude oil for valuation purposes.

Don’t use these rates for arm’s length sales.

Category 1 oil

These are the crude oils valued using Price Reporting Agency data.

The crudes for category 1 are:

  • Brent
  • Ekofisk
  • Flotta
  • Forties
  • Statfjord

This publication shows category 1 values for 2016, 2015 and 2014. Earlier years are on the
National Archives website.

Category 2 oil

All other blends (including LPGs and condensates) are classed as category 2.

Category 2 oils are valued using deal data supplied to the Large Business (LB) Oil and Gas Sector in Petroleum Revenue Tax Returns.

The valuation methods used are similar to the way each particular blend is sold at arm’s length, and are agreed with industry.

Source: HMRC

Detailed guide: Share valuations: EMI and SIP share schemes

Updated: ‘How long valuations are valid for’ has been updated to provide more clarity on the length of any extension period.

Overview

If you operate an EMI or a SIP there are a number of occasions when you need to agree the value of your shares with HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) Shares and Assets Valuation (SAV).

Here you’ll find out how you can get your shares valued by SAV and the service you can expect.

How to get your shares valued

For SIPs

You need to:

For EMIs

You need to:

  • propose both the unrestricted market value and actual market value for any shares under options that carry restrictions which affect their market value
  • fill in and return the VAL 231 form

See the return address for your form

How long valuations are valid for

EMIs

Valuations for EMIs are valid for 60 days from the date of the agreement. You may be able to extend this agreement period for a further 30 days by writing to SAV. Include written confirmation that no significant events have happened since the original valuation or are likely to happen in the period for which you’re asking for the extension.

SAV contact details

SIPs

You may be able to agree with SAV that the agreed valuation stands for a defined period of 6 months. You can end this defined period at any time before the end of 6 months by contacting SAV.

The defined period would also end early if a significant event happens which is likely to impact the share value.

When the defined period ends, you may apply to extend it by writing to SAV. You’ll need to provide written confirmation that no significant events have happened since the original valuation or are likely to happen in the period for which you’re asking for the extension.

SAV contact details

Significant events

Significant events can include (but aren’t limited to):

  • any change (completed or actively contemplated) in the share or loan capital of the company
  • any arm’s length transaction (completed or actively contemplated) involving shares of the company
  • negotiations or preparations for a flotation or takeover
  • any declaration of a dividend on any class of shares in the company
  • the publication by the company of any new financial information, for example, the annual accounts or interim results or announcement

You only need to tell HMRC about a significant event when you next need a valuation. After a significant event, you must reapply to have your shares valued.

What to expect from SAV

When SAV has all the information it needs, it aims to reach an agreed valuation within 4 weeks of getting your request form. If it has to ask for further information, this can take longer.

If you want to appoint an accountant or professional valuation firm, SAV will deal directly with them. Make sure the relevant section on the VAL 230 or 231 form is signed for and on behalf of the company. You should also make sure your professional adviser has all the facts, as you’ll be responsible for the accuracy of the information given to SAV.

If you or your professional advisors want to meet to discuss the valuation, SAV will try to arrange one at a mutually convenient time and place. This may mean the process takes longer than usual.

SAV will always be courteous, fair and professional. If you or your professional advisers raise a question or issue in writing, it aims to respond within 10 working days and, if it can’t, will let you know the reason for the delay and when you can expect a full response.

You can expect SAV to explain any actions it takes, for instance, why it:

  • would like to meet with you
  • needs to question any explanation you’ve given
  • proposes a valuation different to yours

Your company, its directors and its shareholders have the right to the same degree of confidentiality that all taxpayers receive. Except in the limited circumstances allowed by law – such as at tribunal hearings – SAV will only give information to people you have authorised.

Complaints

If you think SAV has made a mistake or treated you unfairly, you can ask for the matter to be reviewed. The assistant director in charge of the part of SAV where the valuation was carried out will complete the review.

To find out how to make a complaint, read the complaints factsheet.

If you’re still not happy with the outcome, the factsheet also explains how you can take your complaint further.

Source: HMRC