Collection: Personal pensions: contribution and tax relief statistics

Updated: Updates to Tables PEN3, PEN4 and PEN5.

These statistics provide:

  • the value of contributions to non-occupational personal pensions
  • tax relief estimates for employer and individual contributions to personal and occupational non-State registered pension schemes

Methodology is explained in the statistics along with additional analysis and commentary.

HMRC has renumbered the tables:

  • table PEN1 – was previously Table 7.16
  • table PEN2 – was previously Tables 7.4 & 7.5 now combined.
  • table PEN2.1 – was previously Table 7.4
  • table PEN2.2 – was previously Table 7.5
  • table PEN3 – was previously Table 7.10
  • table PEN4 – was previously Table 7.11
  • table PEN5 – was previously Table 7.12
  • table PEN6 – was previously Table 7.9

Some previous updates to these statistics can now be found on the National Archives website.

Source: HMRC

Detailed guide: Money laundering supervision: business premises you need to register

Updated: The examples of premises that must register with HMRC now include ‘virtual offices’ and ‘agent premises’. New guidance has been added for registering where you have several outlets at one address.

Premises to register

You must tell HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) about your premises when you register for anti-money laundering supervision.

You’ll need to pay fees for each premises where you carry out certain types of business and related activities covered by the Money Laundering Regulations.

This includes:

  • offices
  • shops and auction houses
  • call centres
  • cruise ships (in UK territorial waters)
  • home address or contact address (if you don’t have a business address)
  • virtual offices and agent premises

Several outlets at one address

If you run more than one outlet from the same address, such as an airport, you can treat each outlet as a single premises and you’ll only pay one fee. They must all be managed by the business and all staff must be employed by the business. The nominated officer for the business must be responsible for all the outlets.

Premises you don’t need to register

You don’t need to register any premises that are outside the UK or that you only use for:

  • storing your business records
  • training employees
  • generally managing your employees

If any part of processing transactions takes place there though, such as paperwork being completed, you’ll need to register the premises.

Agents or franchisees

You should register your agent’s or franchisees’ premises if:

  • you have an overview of transactions from all your agents or franchisees which they don’t have
  • you’re responsible for the way their business is run
  • you’re putting in place the anti-money laundering controls and procedures used when they deal with your customers

You don’t have to register your agent’s or franchisees’ premises if you have little control over the:

  • way they work
  • anti-money laundering controls they put in place

They must then apply to register their premises instead.

You should contact HMRC if you’re not sure which premises to include, or you’re an agent or franchisee wanting to know if you need to register.

Source: HMRC

Detailed guide: Money laundering supervision for accountancy service providers

Updated: Content reviewed and updated to simplify the registration process.

Who should register

You may have to register with HMRC if your business operates as an accountancy service provider.

Under Money Laundering Regulations accountancy service providers are:

  • auditors who carry out statutory audit work
  • accountants who provide accountancy services to clients
  • tax advisers and consultants who provide advice to clients about their tax affairs
  • payroll agents that provide accountancy services and/or tax advice
  • customs practitioners, freight forwarders and similar businesses if they provide accountancy or tax services

The services they provide can be recording, reviewing, analysing, calculating and reporting on financial information for other people. This includes:

  • professional bookkeeping services
  • accounts preparation and signing
  • tax advice, for example:
    • help with completing and submitting tax returns or duty claims
    • advice on whether something is liable to a tax or duty
    • advice on the amount of tax or duty that is due

If you do some but not all of these things, and you’re still not sure, you can contact HMRC for guidance.

Who doesn’t need to register

You don’t need to register if:

  • you’re an Insolvency Practitioner (you’ll be supervised by the Insolvency Service)
  • you give tax advice or accountancy services on a non-commercial basis, for example within your own organisation rather than to a third party

Payroll businesses that don’t need to register

If you’re a payroll services provider to a third party, you’re not an accountancy service provider for the purposes of the Money Laundering Regulations if you:

  • provide software or hardware service support for payroll data processing, as long as you don’t analyse or prepare any financial information
  • pay invoiced service fees to self-employed people, umbrella companies, partnerships or other corporate service providers
  • operate as a body like an umbrella company or a managed service company and carry out payroll functions for employees who are working on assignments for an end-user client
  • provide recruitment or human resources management services and carry out payroll functions as a small part of your main business activity (for example, you might be an employment business that supplies or manages temporary or contract workers)

Customs practitioners that don’t need to register

If you’re in business as a customs practitioner, a freight forwarder or similar, you’re not covered by the Money Laundering Regulations if you only provide services like:

  • helping your clients with classifying or valuing exports and imports for customs purposes
  • helping clients to comply with customs and other procedures, like using simplified declaration procedures or facilities like warehousing
  • helping clients with import or export licensing, and submitting import and export declarations on their behalf
    paying duties, taxes and levies on behalf of importers

Accountancy service providers already registered or supervised elsewhere

If you’re an accountancy service provider you must register with HMRC unless:

  • you’re already supervised for Money Laundering Regulations purposes by a professional body
  • all your customers are themselves supervised by HMRC or a professional body

The main supervisory bodies

For Money Laundering Regulations, the main supervisory bodies for accountants, bookkeepers, tax advisers and other financial advisers are the:

  • Association of Accounting Technicians
  • Association of Chartered Certified Accountants
  • Association of International Accountants
  • Association of Taxation Technicians
  • Chartered Institute of Management Accountants
  • Chartered Institute of Taxation
  • Financial Conduct Authority
  • Institute of Certified Bookkeepers
  • Institute of Chartered Accountants in Ireland
  • Institute of Chartered Accountants in Scotland
  • Institute of Chartered Accountants of England and Wales
  • Institute of Financial Accountants
  • International Association of Bookkeepers
  • Law Society

If you’re supervised by one of these bodies you don’t need to register with HMRC.

If all your customers are accountancy service providers

If all your customers are accountancy service providers supervised by HMRC or a professional body, you don’t need to register so long as:

  • you don’t do business directly with the supervised accountancy service providers’ own customers
  • you’re included in the supervised accountancy service providers’ anti money laundering controls and procedures, suspicious activity reporting, and training programmes
  • you have a written contract with each of your customers confirming that every aspect of the relationship between you meets all anti money laundering requirements

You need to meet all of these conditions, otherwise you’ll need to register.

How to register

Apply to register with HMRC using the online service. You’ll be able to pay your fees at the same time.

Annual renewal

At the end of each registration period we’ll send you a renewal notice inviting you to renew your registration by paying the annual fee on all your listed premises. If you don’t need your registration to continue then you should notify HMRC.

If you don’t pay the correct renewal fee then HMRC may terminate your registration and remove your business from its anti-money laundering register.

Source: HMRC

Detailed guide: Money laundering supervision for money service businesses

Updated: Content reviewed and updated to simply the registration process.

If you’re already supervised by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), you don’t also need to register with HMRC.

You must not run a money service business until you’ve registered.

The term money service business has a special meaning under the Money Laundering Regulations.

When you put anti-money laundering policies and procedures in place, you must make sure they cover all your activities carried out under the regulations.

Who should register

You must register your business if it:

  • acts as a bureau de change, even if this is on a ship that isn’t always in UK territorial waters
  • transmits money, or any representation of money (just collecting and delivering money as a cash courier isn’t transmitting money)
  • cashes cheques that are payable to your customers
  • is a pawnbroker acting as a money service business
  • has a consumer credit license and is acting as a money service business

If you exchange currency or cash cheques occasionally

You don’t have to register if you meet all of these conditions:

  • the total turnover from your money service activities is no more than £64,000 a year or 5% of your total annual turnover
  • currency exchange or cheque cashing transactions worth more than €1,000 are limited to one per customer (this could be a single transaction or a series of smaller transactions that seem to be linked)
  • money service activities must be secondary to your main business activity and directly related to it
  • the currency exchange or cheque cashing service must only be available to customers of the main business, it mustn’t be available to the public
  • your business isn’t operating as a trust or company service provider or an accountancy service provider

Transmitting money that’s not ‘by way of business’

If you transmit money from time to time but not by way of business you may not have to register. If you think you fall into this category contact HMRC to check.

Cash courier

If you collect money from your customers and deliver it to someone else, like re-stocking cash dispensers and delivering cash for shops you don’t need to register.

How to register

You should apply to register with HMRC using the online service. The registration will include a fit and proper check and you’ll also be able to pay the relevant fees online.

Annual renewal

At the end of each registration period we’ll send you a renewal notice inviting you to renew your registration by paying the annual fee on all your listed premises. If you don’t need your registration to continue then you should notify HMRC.

If you don’t pay the correct renewal fee then HMRC may terminate your registration and remove your business from its anti-money laundering register.

Source: HMRC

Detailed guide: Money laundering supervision: register with HMRC

Updated: The online registration service is now available.

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) is a supervisory body for Money Laundering Regulations. Check if you need to register your business with us.

You must tell us about your premises in your application to register and you must pay the relevant fees due.

Your application won’t be reviewed until the fees have been paid.

Accessing the service

You’ll use your Government Gateway account User ID and password to sign in.

If you don’t already have a Government Gateway account, you’ll be able to register for one at the beginning of the online service.

If you’re unable to use the online service, email the Anti-Money Laundering Team at amls.communicationsteam@hmrc.gsi.gov.uk and provide your contact details. They’ll send you a form to complete and to send to HMRC by post.

What happens next

You may have to send additional documents to HMRC if you’re a money service business or a trust or company service provider. Fit and proper checks will be applied to the ‘responsible’ people you include in your application.

HMRC will review your application. This can take up to 45 days.

We’ll send you an email when a decision has been made. You’ll need to sign in to see if your application has been accepted or refused. If you disagree with the decision you can appeal.

Source: HMRC

National Statistics: Personal tax credits: provisional statistics

Updated: Child and Working Tax Credits provisional statistics for April 2017 added.

The finalised award statistics relate to the complete retrospective picture for the year, based on a finalised view of family incomes and circumstances. The caseload population will be different between the two publications as a result of HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) knowing the complete finalised picture of the award. These statistics are from 2009 to 2017.

Source: HMRC

Detailed guide: Stamp Duty Land Tax: online returns

Updated: The address for queries on late payment interest charges has been changed.

Stamp Duty Land Tax (SDLT) no longer applies in Scotland. Instead you pay Land and Buildings Transaction Tax when you buy a property.

Deadlines

You must tell HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) about most UK land and property transactions on an SDLT return. This must be within 30 days of the ‘effective date’ of the transaction, even if you don’t owe any tax. The payment deadline is the same as for the return. You can pay any SDLT as soon as you’ve submitted your return.

The effective date

The effective date is usually the date the transfer is completed. But it can be the date the contract is ‘substantially performed’ if this is before completion. ‘Substantial performance’ is when one of the following happens:

  • most of the buying price is paid – normally 90% and payment can be in cash or something else of economic value
  • the buyer is entitled to possession of the property
  • the first payment of rent is made

You’ll pay a fixed penalty if you file your return late.

Who must send a return

You must tell HMRC about land and property transactions on an SDLT return. Some land and property transactions are exempt from SDLT and don’t need to be put on an SDLT return. These include:

  • transactions where no money or other payment changes hands
  • property left to you in a will
  • property transferred because of divorce or civil partnership dissolution

You must tell HMRC about all other land and property transactions on an SDLT return.

Most people use a solicitor or legal conveyancer to act for them, but it’s the buyer’s responsibility to tell HMRC and pay any SDLT you owe.

If you’re acting on the buyer’s behalf, you can submit your return online and pay any tax due once you:

  • have their authority on record
  • know the effective date of the transaction

Paper returns

If you need to send HMRC a paper return, for example, because you’re not represented by a solicitor or an agent, you must use the SDLT1 paper return form.

Send HMRC your return online

Log in to your online account to send your SDLT return to HMRC.

You can go back to a return you’ve already started.

Use the User ID and password you got when you registered for Stamp Taxes Online or when you set up your online account.

When you submit your return, you’ll get an SDLT5 certificate which will have a Unique Transaction Reference Number (UTRN). Print this and post it to the Land Registry with your application for registration.

You can use the HMRC free service or there’s a range of commercial software providers you can choose from.

If you use the HMRC Stamp Taxes Online service, you must fill in and file the SDLT return electronically. HMRC reject returns that are filled in electronically but printed and posted, or printed and filled in by hand.

Add extra details to an electronic SDLT certificate

The electronic SDLT5 certificate will show details of the first property address for any transaction. If there are multiple addresses, or more than one seller or buyer, from the ‘View, print and store’ section of the online SDLT return, print a PDF version of forms:

  • SDLT2
  • SDLT3
  • SDLT4

Send these to the Land Registry by post together with a copy of the electronic SDLT5.

Save a copy of the return and the certificate and keep a record of the UTRN for every transaction.

Transactions with large numbers of properties, sellers or buyers

If you’re dealing with a transaction that has a large number of properties or there are multiple sellers or buyers, you can still file your return online.

You can enter a maximum of 99 entries (any combination of buyers, sellers or properties). When the system tells you that you can’t add any more, give the additional details separately on a schedule with details relating to each additional property, seller or buyer – include the UTRN number. Send your schedule to the Stamp Duty Land Tax Office.

Penalties if you file or pay late

If you don’t file your SDLT return by the filing date, you’ll pay an automatic fixed penalty. The amount of the penalty depends on how late you file your return.

If you file it:

  • within 3 months after the filing date the fixed penalty is £100
  • more than 3 months after the filing date the fixed penalty is £200

If you don’t file your SDLT return within 12 months after the filing date you’ll pay a tax-based penalty as well as the fixed penalty. The tax-based penalty can be up to the full amount of the tax due on the return.

Appeal against a penalty

Appeal against a penalty if you couldn’t file your SDLT return by the deadline because of an unusual event that was either unforeseeable or beyond your control. HMRC will only accept that you had a reasonable excuse for not meeting the deadline if this event prevented you from either:

  • filing the return yourself
  • making arrangements for someone else to file it

Interest charges

You must pay any SDLT due within 30 days after the effective date of the transaction. If you pay the tax late, you’ll pay interest from the day after you should have paid it until the date when you actually pay it.

If you don’t pay the tax due on the transaction by the deadline, HMRC will send you a letter telling you about your underpayment. They send this to both the buyer and their agent and it tells you how much tax you’ve underpaid and how much interest you’ve been charged so far.

You should pay the tax and the interest as soon as possible.

HMRC uses the official rate of interest set by HM Treasury to work out how much interest you’ll have to pay. They’ll charge interest if:

  • they haven’t received your payment of the tax due
  • there’s no evidence to show beyond reasonable doubt that you sent your payment when you filed your SDLT return

You can’t appeal against a late payment interest charge

Interest charged on tax isn’t a penalty so you can’t appeal against it. It’s a charge to compensate HMRC for not having the money when they should have so you must pay it.

If you believe that the lateness is due to an HMRC action, write and explain why you think that HMRC’s actions caused the late payment. Include any supporting evidence with your letter.

If you don’t think you should pay interest, think you’ve been charged too much, or want a full interest breakdown, write to:

BT – Stamp Duty Land Tax

HM Revenue and Customs

BX9 1HD

United Kingdom

If you need to amend your return

How to amend your return within 12 months of the filing date

You’ve 12 months from the filing date to amend your return. The filing date is 30 days after the effective date of the transaction.

You can correct minor errors by phone, for example you can change ‘49 Bath clase’ to ‘49 Bath Close’. For other substantial errors you’ll need to write to us.

Amend by phone

Minor changes can be made by calling the Stamp Duty Land Tax helpline, these include:

  • vendor details
  • some typographical errors in the property address
  • wrong title number
  • effective date of the transaction – if the change doesn’t mean the return was received before the transaction was completed, if this applies you’ll need to:
  • correcting the purchase price or other tax details

When you call you must tell us:

  • the UTRN for your transaction
  • details of the changes you want us to make

If we can’t make the change, we’ll tell you what to do next.

If the change means you’ve paid too much tax, you can write to us for a refund. If you send us a refund claim, you must also send us the:

  • contract for the land transaction
  • instrument, if any, by which the transaction was effected – for example the transfer document or lease

If the change means you’ve not paid enough tax, you must pay us this amount right away.

Amend by post

Changes where you need to write to Stamp Duty Land Tax Office include:

  • add a title number – send us a copy of the contract
  • purchaser details – to either add or remove a purchaser, send us a copy of the contract
  • substantial error in property address or to add a property – send us a copy of the contract
  • cancel a duplicate return – tell us all of the right and wrong UTRNs

We’ll write back confirming the amendment and tell you if you need to take any further action.

Changes we can’t make

We can’t make any change which alters the underlying identity of the transaction. For example where the purchaser or property is completely wrong.

Call the Stamp Duty Land Tax helpline for help with any further queries.

HMRC can open an enquiry into your amended return up to 9 months after you amended it. If you got a repayment but the amount you were repaid wasn’t due, you must pay it back.

Amend a return when HMRC open a formal enquiry

You can still amend your return after HMRC has started to make an enquiry but your amendment can’t take effect until after the enquiry is finished. If, at the end of the enquiry, HMRC finds that your return is incorrect, you’ll be told how to amend it. HMRC will take into account any amendment you’ve already asked for.

If you’ve sent a return in error or sent a duplicate return

If you send a return for a transaction that doesn’t need a return or a duplicate return, write to Stamp Duty Land Tax Office to ask them to disregard it.

Include the following information:

  • the UTRN
  • the reason(s) why they should disregard the return
  • whether you’ve used the SDLT5 certificate to register the transaction

If you’ve filed an unnecessary or duplicate return and incurred a penalty charge that you want to dispute, appeal in writing. This must be within 30 days of the date on the penalty notice.

If you’ve made a mistake on your SDLT return that’s more than 12 months old

HMRC Stamp Taxes can amend a buyer’s name, but can’t make any amendments that change either the underlying identity of any buyer or the property details.

You can’t correct other mistakes on your SDLT return more than 12 months after the filing deadline. You may still be able to claim a refund if the mistake means you’ve paid too much SDLT.

To ask HMRC to amend a return older than 12 months write to Stamp Duty Land Tax Office explaining what the error is, how it arose and include a copy of your original return.

Claim a refund

How to claim a refund of the higher SDLT rates for additional properties

If you’ve paid the higher SDLT rates for additional properties on the purchase of a new main residence, and go on to sell your previous main residence within 3 years of paying the higher rates, a refund is available.

The refund is for the amount of SDLT paid above what would have been charged had the property not been an additional residential property.

A refund must be claimed within 3 months of the sale of the previous main residence or within 12 months of the filing date of the return, whichever comes later.

To claim a refund you can complete an online form.

Refunds in other circumstances

The deadline for claiming back tax you’ve overpaid is 4 years from the effective date of the transaction. This is usually the completion date.
Claim the refund by writing to Stamp Duty Land Tax Office. Quote the UTRN and include a copy of the original SDLT return with your claim and:

  • explain why you think you’ve overpaid
  • say what parts of the SDLT return were wrong
  • give revised figures and confirm the amount of refund due
  • confirm who we should repay

Who we should repay

HMRC can only pay the refund to you, unless you write to give your permission to pay it to someone else, for example, your solicitor or agent. Any authority letter you send us must clearly tell us who we should repay.

If you’re a solicitor or agent and you want us to pay any refund due to your client, you need to:

  • write to Stamp Duty Land Tax Office to confirm this
  • tell us where we should send the refund
  • send us your client’s consent if we need to send it to you

When you need to send us additional documents when claiming a refund

You also need to send us further documents to support any refund you ask us to make where one, or both, of the following conditions apply. The original figures in the SDLT return:

  • have already been amended
  • are wrong, but a refund is still due after we make any further changes you need to make

If one, or both, of the conditions shown above apply, you’ll need to send us copies of the:

  • contract for the land transaction
  • instrument (if any) by which that transaction was effected – this is generally the relevant transfer document, the lease or similar document

If any of these documents don’t apply to your transaction you’ll need to tell us when you write to us.

If you’ve underpaid SDLT

If you’ve underpaid SDLT tell HMRC as soon as you realise. If you don’t, you may have to pay a penalty.

You’ll normally have to pay interest on any SDLT you pay late.

Source: HMRC